Sunday, January 23, 2011

SUPERNOVA

My energy is on the rise. The countdown has started to when I'll hit the most holy of the holiest: Norway. First, a week in Oslo in May, and then a month in the mountains in July and August. The place is booked. Hallelujah. While I feel indestructibly powerful, the feeling of freedom that Norway gives me reminds me as well of the fact that I'm also free to feel humble. Such joy, to be on top of the mountains of abstraction. And such warmth, to know that the vistas from there are not conflicting. Mentally I'm already in the new cabin looking outside the window and thinking: here I'm most logical and also most esoteric. And it's fine. It's not even uncommon. While I'm typing this right now, being physically in my own living room, I'm facing equally grand vistas: the shelf of books containing esoteric wisdom. My eyes glance sideways along the spine of Michael Dummett's book: The Visconti- Sforza Tarot Cards. Hmm. Of course, I say to myself, and why not? If it didn't bother Michael Dummett to be a Professor of Logic at Oxford and to write books about tarot, why should it bother me? Mother was another example of combining cutting sharpness with acknowledging that repudiating what we don't know that we do know is a bad idea. If it hadn't been too impractical to become a philosopher in Romania in the 80s, she would have liked me to become a logician... and more. All the same. Alexander Neckam, or Albricus, was also a professor at Oxford around 1186 and taught The Song of Songs and other images to all who had a mature mind and sublime intelligence ["maturi pectoris & sublimis intelligentie"]. His teachings reflected his experiences with the Sardae Sagae, the wise women of Sardinia, who, immediately after the explosion of the supernova of 1181, took him to their subterranean temple Ta Rat' and initiated him into the fuller meaning of the Imagines Arcanae [Secret Images]. I said previously in another fragment that Norway is my lucky star. A fragment of my own supernova. Blessings unto it.


15 comments:

Ida Klitgård said...

Tell me more...

Camelia said...

How much are you willing to pay?

Bent Sørensen said...

Careful, or she'll give you an offer you can't refuse...

Ida Klitgård said...

Surely I don't need to pay for wisdom

Camelia said...

What world are you living in? --- Though Bent is right... There are some things that call for prudence. One has to be ready... to learn about that which goes beyond ambivalence.

Wolf Wucherpfennig said...

Is there anything really important going beyond ambivalence?

Camelia said...

If one knew what happened beyond ambivalence, one wouldn't pose that question. On a hunch, however, yes, I'd say, geometry.

Wolf Wucherpfennig said...

Do you know "Don Juan oder die Liebe zur Geometrie" by Max Frisch?

Camelia said...

No, what does he say?

Wolf Wucherpfennig said...

It's an interesting theater piece, which analyzes the love of geometry and unequivocalness (if this word exists in English)

Camelia said...

Interesting. In the renaissance geometry indicated the love of measure, which, in a way, is thus all about duality and its relation to the principal laws of correspondence, attraction, rhythm, causation, etc.

Wolf Wucherpfennig said...

Yes, the ancient idea of harmonia mundi, which has been transferred to the Christians on the basis of Sap. 11, 21, was a great idea. And quadrivium were still valid in Renaissance. However, I think that ambivalence is the core of the art, both ancient and modern.

Camelia said...

As they say, all good art is the result of struggle. And yet...

Wolf Wucherpfennig said...

I think in the last analysis we can agree with each other

Camelia said...

Indeed we can. If we allow for the operative phrase 'and yet' to function at its fullest potential, then we'll all know that what is suggested in that which beings in contradiction might just as well end in union. When the gates are open, there's no room for narrow-mindedness.